Tag Archives: living with food allergies

An Allergy Friendly Vacation In Photos

My parents, husband and I recently vacationed at the beach and had a great time. However, it takes a ton of preparation, thought, and luggage to have an allergy friendly vacation. While food is an obvious part of the process, there are other things that many of us have to think about when planning to be away from home.

couch

I once had a reaction to a couch that had sunscreen in the fabric, and couch foam and fabric can also contain soy. I always bring a sheet to place over the couch along with a throw blanket in cooler months.

IMG_1916

I always bring some king size sheets so I am prepared for whatever size bed is available. I also bring my own pillows and blankets.

toliet_paper

My own toilet paper is a critical part of packing.

IMG_1915

I bring my own towels from home that are washed in my laundry detergent.

IMG_1920

Housekeeping is very tricky when you travel with your own toiletries and sheets. When my husband and I travel alone, I request no housekeeping. When I travel with others that want housekeeping, I put a sign on my bed so that sheets are not mistakenly changed.

IMG_1926

I also bring my own soap as well as a sign for a bathroom requesting no housekeeping so that my toilet paper, towels, etc. do not get mixed in.

water_bottle

I try to drink from my own glass bottles whenever I can, but the recent floods in South Carolina made it necessary to drink from plastic water bottles. I labeled my bottles with my initials. This is not just to keep from drinking after someone else to avoid germs. Drinking after someone can expose you to allergies based on what they have been eating.

SunandEarth

Other items I took with me were dishwasher detergent, dishwashing liquid, household cleaner, and laundry detergent.

For someone that is newly diagnosed with food allergies, planning to be away can be a daunting task. The good news is that is gets easier and easier. Try making a list of everything that you pack for your first vacation, save it on your computer, and make changes to it each time you travel. It will take the stress out of forgetting something, because you will have everything written down.

I can also tell you that now that I am accustomed to bringing my own personal items, I am able to relax so much more. There’s something very comforting about being surrounded by your own things from home, and you can feel like you are really creating a safe environment.

Calling All Food Allergy Survivors: What other items do you enjoy traveling with that help keep you safe?

Advertisements

A Survivor Story

This week, I am turning over a new leaf.  I am getting back to the basics of why I started this blog and my commitment to help those with food allergies and intolerances. I would like to start with the story of Denton, a truly talented and inspiring individual that I have been blessed to know for over a year now. Those of us with food allergies or intolerances know that food issues can be related to a host of immune system and/or digestive issues. While many of us know someone with food allergies, there are many other immune system and digestive ailments that share a common thread: food. I know that many of you will relate to Denton’s story and my hope is that you will also find encouragement.
It all started my junior year in high school. At the time was playing 3 sports, led in numerous clubs and organizations, and somehow managed to keep a 4.0 GPA. One day, the school held it’s annual blood drive. I showed up eager to donate to the cause. When it was time to draw blood, The nurse pricked my finger to check my iron levels. With a look of motherly concern she eyed the screen, then me, then the screen again. She tells me not only am I iron deficient and anemic, but I have the lowest reading of all the students she tested today.
Then came the fatigue. I went from straight A’s to was now nodding off in class, grades slipping. Athleticism began to wane. Then came the stomach cramps from hell that kept me up many nights. This was much more than your average tummy ache and it was time visit a doctor.
Several colonoscopies and months later I was diagnosed with Chron’s disease – An incurable, unpredictable form of Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Not the best news for a kid one year away from attending college. A kid who is more than ready to fully experience the “college life”. This made hiding my Crohn’s from others seem like the most viable option.
Throughout the rest of high school and into my early college years, I longed to just be “normal” person. My remission periods provided a tantalizing glimpse of this normalcy making it very easy to forget I even have the disease. Crohn’s was knocking at the door and instead of answering, I waited for it to leave, Unfortunately, Crohn’s was not playing ‘ding-dong ditch’. Late in the fall of my junior year, the disease kicked down the door.
I woke up feeling extremely bloated and nauseous. I skipped class that day and decided to get rest. I made sure not to skip any meals because refusing to eat exacerbated issues in the past. Dinner rolled around and I was still feeling strange. I felt so full and started developing what some like to call a “food baby”. This was particularly strange because I didn’t eat much that day. It grew larger as time passed and with it, more pain. I ended up being rushed to the emergency room that night for a complete intestinal blockage. The doctor said it was so severe that if I had waited a few more hours the toxins would have caused my liver to fail and my heart to stop. As I lay there in the hospital bed I realized than in order to live a long and prosperous life, I must control Crohn’s and refuse to let it control me. The most useful tool in any fight is realization that you’re not alone in it. That is why it’s important to join a support system full of people that are going through your struggle. That is also why, even though I don’t necessarily have a food allergy, I fully support Alanna’s vision with AllerThrive.
I’m happy to admit my days of hiding are over. I keep a food diary now which helps me determine what foods cause my flare-ups. I also joined the Colitis and Crohn’s Foundation of America in hopes of starting a chapter at my college to spread awareness for IBD. I’m doing a better job of saying no to my trigger foods, even when tempted with warm, southern-fried cooking I was raised on. But this growth wouldn’t be possible without the influence of people like Alanna. She has this optimism about her food allergy that is infectious and inspiring. That kind of resilience is to be commended.
I hope you have enjoyed Denton’s story, and I look forward to reconnecting with many of you in the months to come. If you have a story to share, contact me at allerthrive@gmail.com.