Tag Archives: cooking with soy allergy

Soy Free Macaroni and Cheese

Need an easy dish for your holiday dinner? This macaroni and cheese recipe is super easy, delicious, and it’s my Mother’s recipe, so I can assure you it’s good! It’s also a great weeknight dinner idea.

 

Maraconi

Soy Free Macaroni and Cheese

One package of pasta (Rice pasta or 100% whole wheat pasta work great and should be soy free.)

2 packages (8 oz) extra sharp cheddar, grated (I use Cabot Seriously Sharp)

Two Eggs (I have found soy free eggs at Whole Foods)

1-2 cups milk as desired(grass fed or unsweetened alternative milk)

Butter (optional-I use Kerrygold grass fed butter)

Boil pasta according to package directions. In a bowl, add egg, milk and optional butter and whisk until blended. In a deep, 8 x 11 baking dish, layer macaroni and cheese without placing top layer of cheese. Pour milk/egg mixture evenly into the dish until the mixture is at least 1/2 to 3/4 of the way up the dish. Bake on 350 for 15 minutes. Top with final layer of cheese and bake in five minute increments. You will know that the dish is done when you place a spoon on the side of the dish and the milk mixture is no longer liquid but also not dry either.

Serves 6-8.

 

Holiday Meal Ideas

Maraconi

The holidays are almost here! While it is certainly an exciting time, there are some challenges that anyone with food allergies will be navigating over the next few weeks. I have been having many conversations with family and friends about get-togethers: Should I bring my own food? What are you preparing and what ingredients are you using? What ingredients to I need to substitute to make a dish that is safe for me?

I have three main issues that I am personally dealing with right now:

1. This is my first Thanksgiving without soy, and watching others eat traditional Thanksgiving food that I can no longer eat is more than I can handle at this point in my journey.

2. I am severely allergic to poinsettias (the red flowers you see during the holidays) and cannot go near a grocery store, shopping mall, restaurant or someone’s home that has  poinsettias. Yep, that means that hubby has to do all the grocery shopping and label reading. (He’s definitely a keeper!!) Side note: poinsettias can sometimes be cross-reactive to latex, so be aware if you are allergic to latex.

3. I have no time to think through how to make alternative dishes with substitute ingredients that are safe for me, not less cook that much food.

The thing is, instead of getting me down, I remind myself constantly that:

The reason why the holidays are important is not because of what is on the plate but because of who is sitting at the table!

I am very excited to be spending time with my family, and I am also very thankful that they are so supportive and also recognize that the food is not what is important. We have decided to have a spaghetti dinner with homemade banana pudding for Thanksgiving. I am supplying the spaghetti sauce (Whole Foods 365 Organic Pasta Sauce), and I will be bringing my own pasta to go with it (Whole Foods 365 Organic Spaghetti.)

Here are some other ideas for Non-Traditional Thanksgiving Meals that everyone can eat. (Place each ingredient in separate bowls with separate spoons, and prepare each ingredient with clean utensils and cooking surfaces.):

  • Build Your Own Tacos (Try Garden of Eatin’ or Bearitos taco shells.)
  • Build Your Own Salad
  • Build Your Own Pasta (With a couple of sauce, pasta and veggie options)
  • Build Your Own Baked Potato or Sweet Potato Bar
  • OR, invite everyone over for a build your own Sundae or Fruit Salad bar. So Delicious and Haagen-Dazs have some soy free ice cream options, although not all are soy free. You could also make delicious banana ice cream from just a couple of ingredients. Google “one ingredient banana ice cream” for ideas.

Calling All Soyvivors: How are you handling the holidays and what are you eating?

 

 

My First Vacation With Soy Allergy

HIltonHeadIsland

Well, my first soy free vacation is over, and although I had a few tell-tale “soy rashes” on my skin, I am happy to say that I did not have any major allergic reactions. We traveled by car for a week-long visit to Hilton Head Island in South Carolina, which is about a 4.5 hour drive from home.

I have to admit that I was very nervous, because anyone with a soy allergy knows how difficult and dangerous it is to travel. Fortunately, a Whole Foods had opened literally days before we arrived, so that eased my stress a good bit.

The other challenge with our trip was that this was a family vacation, and food has always been a big part of that. In years’ past, my husband and I would always join my parents for at least one big meal out a day. I knew that if I ate out every day, I would not only surely run into some soy, but I would also be very nervous and basically turn what should be a relaxing vacation into a stressful vacation. It was more difficult that you would think to avoid eating out, because there were a lot of emotional attachments to this tradition on behalf of my family that had to be sorted out.

We opted to only eat out a couple of times at restaurants that had successfully served me in the past. I ate my usual garden salad and baked potato at Wendy’s. Then, at Olive Garden, I opted for a salad with no dressing or croutons and added olive oil and lemon to the salad (no breadsticks of course.) Then, I ordered the baked shrimp parmesan which was listed as soy free on their allergen menu. There was also a Panera and Mellow Mushroom, which I have successfully used back home.

Otherwise, we managed to eat most of our meals without a lot of cleanup or fuss. We decided for this trip we would eat from paper plates, and we took a large cooler with us on the trip that included chickpeas and other items we would need. For breakfast, I had soy free cereal with rice milk, fruit, nuts and seeds for breakfast OR I had Erewhon graham crackers with almond butter, banana, and some raw pumpkin seeds. For our other meals, we rotated between grilled cheese sandwiches, Amy’s meals (offers some soy free options), Amy’s pizzas, hummus with veggies and chips, and often utilized the salad bar at Whole Foods for our veggies and for meals.

For dessert, I either made banana ice cream, or I visited Rita’s, which has several soy free custard and ice options.

I also brought all of my own hand soap, toilet paper, dishwasher detergent, laundry detergent,  beach chairs and sheets. I immediately washed all of the towels provided by the resort and changed the sheets to my sheets. I have to admit that it actually felt really good to sleep on my own sheets and use my own products, so it was well worth packing them. I also always kept a little hand soap in my purse for when we were not at our resort.

I did get a couple of minor rashes on my arm. We think one of them could have been from the couch in the living room which was likely laden with sunscreen from prior uses. I placed a towel over the couch and that seemed to help. The other reaction stemmed from a lady at Whole Foods who was cleaning a table behind me and sprayed my arm with her cleaner. The reaction was thankfully gone fairly quickly.

Overall, my first vacation was a success, and hopefully that will give me more confidence to travel in the future.

Calling All Soyvivors: Do you have other great travel tips?

 

 

Time Saving Tips for a Soy Free Lifestyle

Many Soyvivors were leading a busy life before they found out about their allergy. They may have been working full-time, raising children, caring for aging parents, or many other of life’s challenges that keep us moving constantly. A food allergy discovery can be devastating to those that have absolutely no time for the hours and hours of research, shopping, phone calls, cooking, medical appointments, emotional turmoil, and self care that all arrive simultaneously like a big slap in the face.

If you have just found out about your allergy, or you have been struggling with the enormous amount of work involved in dealing with your allergy, know that taking some time off from your busy schedule could be critical to the rest of your life. If there is any way that you can take some extensive time off, you definitely need to, and even if it’s a day off, do it NOW. You need time to learn to cook again, learn to shop again, memorize soy ingredients, call manufacturers about food, household, beauty, and medicinal products, and take time to connect with other soy survivors that can give you invaluable advice.

I have a few tips for all of us on our quest to live a happy, soy free life:

  • If you just discovered your soy allergy, you must seek help from a medical professional right away that can give you long-term care and advice.
  • Until you have time to research all of the products you need and test how you react to products, stick to this simple rule of cooking: Only cook whole foods that have not been fed any soy with 100% pure spices and non-soy oils (coconut oil, olive oil, grapeseed oil, etc.) This basically means cooking from scratch for now until you can research and connect.
  • Try to have at least 2-3 soy free items in your fridge or freezer at all times that can be eaten quickly and with little “fuss” that don’t require cooking from scratch. Here are some ideas:
  1. Soy-Free Bread (check Out Rudi’s options), Justin’s Almond Butter, and pure Honey for sandwiches
  2. A Soy-Free Pizza (Try Amy’s Soy Free Options)
  3. Salad Mix with Some Sliced Almonds
  4. A baked potato with toppings
  5. A high-quality frozen lunch option (Amy’s has some great soy-free options)
  6. Quesadillas (Udi’s has a soy free tortilla, but not all products are soy free)
  7. Applegate Natural Uncured Hot Dogs (Applegate has a lot of soy free options, but not all are soy free. They can provide you with a list of items with soy.)
  • Take 2-3 hours each week to cook a batch of something for your freezer that you can use on busy evenings when you do not feel like or have time to cook. Here are some ideas for this:
  1. If you can tolerate chicken, line a baking sheet with aluminum foil (no clean-up!) and bake on 350 for 15 minutes. You can put individuals tenderloins in sandwich bags and then put all sandwich bags in a larger freezer bag. Freeze and reheat when needed.
  2. Bake some fish using the method above for 10 minutes. Freeze.
  3. If you can tolerate beans, cook a package of dried beans and freeze. You can try putting a cup of beans each in sandwich bags and freeze all in a large freezer bag.
  4. Cook a large package of rice and freeze using the method above.
  5. Cook a large batch of some of your favorite recipes. My lentils recipe, my slow cooker curry chicken, or my tomato-less spaghetti freezes well.

You will be surprised at how quickly you will fill your freezer with meals that you can use when you just don’t feel like or have the time to cook.

You may also find one or two restaurants in your area that can offer a soy free carry-out option. For me, I love plain wings and a tossed salad from Mellow Mushroom, or a baked potato and a garden salad from Wendy’s with some sliced almonds added for protein.

Planning your meals a week at a time can also be a huge time saver. I have four weeks worth of meals on a spreadsheet along with the shopping list for each meal. I copy and paste what I want for the week which creates my shopping list from there. It keeps me from having to spend precious time and energy during the week stressing about what I am going to cook and making unnecessary trips to the grocery. I will share my meal spreadsheet in upcoming blog posts.

Also take some time to think about how others in your household can help you. They may be more than willing to help you when they find that it relieves a lot of stress and creates more harmony in the house. For instance, because of my reflux, I have to eat early before my husband arrives home from work. We have an agreement that I will cook and he will clean up. You may find that some of your children can help with the dishes or your older children may be able to help with soy product research. If your nearest health food store is a bit of a drive from your home, ask others to pick up items from you if they are visiting, and offer to do the same for them when you shop.

I would love to hear about your time saving tips for thriving with a soy free life! Please share in the comments below!