Are You Allergic to Your Antihistamine?

This week, my project was to call several manufacturers of over-the-counter antihistamines to find out which products I felt comfortable with adding to my allergy friendly store.

I wanted to make these calls because, when I had my first reaction to soy, I took an over-the-counter antihistamine a few hours after the reaction, and suddenly my itching got worse and remained for another 12-24 hours after that.

Based on my conversations with the manufacturer, there was soy in the antihistamine that I took that day.

That is very frustrating. Why a company would allow one of top 8 food allergies into an allergy product is baffling to me. However, the fact remains that this is reality and something Soyvivors have to deal with. In fact, MANY over-the-counter and prescription medications contain soy. My pharmacist actually told me that it was rare to have a prescription drug that had soy in it.

Unfortunately I found out the hard way through an allergic reaction that some prescription drugs (including tablets and capsules) do in fact contain soy.

You have to call the manufacturer before you know for sure, and even then they can’t always tell you where the ingredients are derived from. Sad, isn’t it?

We are putting products in (and on) our bodies that have been manufactured from unknown sources!

I have had manufacturers of everything from medications to hair products to bath products to basically say, “I don’t know where these ingredients come from.” Manufacturers do not even have to list soy as an ingredient in non-food products, and even in foods, there are some ingredients (soybean oil and soy lecithin, etc.) that they are not required to list.

Most companies encourage patients to call them immediately to report any allergic reactions. This is critical.

If more of us call to report adverse events, manufacturers will be more likely to listen and make soy free products.

Always check the inactive ingredients in any medication. Some potentially soy-derived ingredients in medications include glycerine, polyethylene glycol, cellulose, and magnesium stearate. Check out my soy ingredient list for more ingredients.

Visit my allergy friendly store to see which antihistamines I would use myself and then use that to do your own research to find the product that is right for you. As always, I highly recommend calling the manufacturer to verify ingredients and ask that you also seek advice from a medical professional before using any product. Manufacturers can change the ingredients in their product at any time, and products may even vary depending on the distributor.

 

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3 thoughts on “Are You Allergic to Your Antihistamine?

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